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Aeneids in Translation

Submitted by Anonymous on
28001
38001
=CLAS 37200, CLCV 27200, FNDL 26611
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2007-2008
David Wray

We confront Virgil's Aeneid in translation as a poem, as an artifact and representation of Greco-Roman culture, as a response to a millennial oral (Homeric) poetic tradition and a particular historical (Augustan) moment, as a reflection of ancient thought rich with significance for contemporary questions about human life, and as a central piece of world literature. Readings include comparative study of English poetic translations ranging from early modernity (Caxton, Douglas, Phayer, Surrey, and Dryden) to the twentieth century (Taylor, Lewis, Jackson Knight, Mandelbaum, and Fitzgerald) and beyond (Lombardo and Fagles). Students who are majoring in Comparative Literature compare versions of a book of the Aeneid in at least two languages.

Novels of Self-Discovery: Stendhal, Flaubert, and Fontane

Submitted by Anonymous on
28701
38701
=CMLT 28701. FREN 26400/36400
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2007-2008
Thomas Pavel

PQ: Third- or fourth-year standing and consent of instructor. This course is a study of Stendhal's The Charterhouse of Parma, Flaubert's Madame Bovary, and Fontane's Effi Briest that emphasizes the search for self-identity and the erratic pursuit of happiness. Classes conducted in English. Students who are majoring or minoring in French read the French texts in the original and participate in a weekly French discussion group.

The Idea of Europe in Realist Prose

Submitted by Anonymous on
29301
39301
=CMLT 29301. ENGL 28907/48907, ISHU 29303, SLAV 29800/39800
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2007-2008
Lina Steiner

The idea of Europe as a shared cultural space, in which different national cultures and literatures can engage in a dialogue, emerges in the second half of the nineteenth century in the works of the Western-European authors and several outsiders who include Gogol, Turgenev, and Henry James. This course examines the connections between the development of realist fiction and the formation of the transnational cultural conception of Europe as a realist-age successor of Goethe's conception of Weltliteratur. Our texts include fictional works, essays, and criticism by Goethe, Mme. de Stael Gogol, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Turgenev, and Henry James. Texts in English and the original; discussion and papers in English.