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Before and After Beckett

Submitted by ldzoells on
20801
40801
ENGL 24408/44508; TAPS 28424
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2017-2018
Loren Kruger
 

Beckett is conventionally typed as the playwright of minimalist scenes of unremitting bleakness, but his experiments with theatre and film echo the irreverent play of popular culture (vaudeville on stage and screen, e.g. Chaplin and Keaton) as well as experimental theatre and modern philosophy, even when there are no direct lines of influence. This course will juxtapose these points of reference with Beckett's plays and those of his contemporaries (Ionesco, Genet and others in French, Pinter in English). It will then explore more recent plays that suggest the influence of Beckett by Pinter, Carul Churchill and Sarah Kane in English; Albert Jarry and Michel Vinaver in French, as well as the relevance of theorists and philosophers including Barthes, Wittgenstein, and critics writing on specific plays. Prerequisites: HUM CORE and at least one college level course in drama or TAPS. French is helpful but not required.

Prosody and Poetic Form: An Introduction to Comparative Metrics

Submitted by ldzoells on
22303
32303
CLCV 21313, CLAS 31313, SLAV 22303, SLAV 32303, GRMN 22314, GRMN 32314, ENGL 22310, ENGL 32303
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2017-2018
Boris Maslov

This class offers (i) an overview of major European systems of versification, with particular attention to their historical development, and (ii) an introduction to the theory of meter. In addition to analyzing the formal properties of verse, we will inquire into their relevance for the articulation of poetic genres and, more broadly, the history of literary (and sub-literary) systems. There will be some emphasis on Graeco-Roman quantitative metrics, its afterlife, and the evolution of Germanic and Slavic syllabo-tonic verse. No prerequisites, but a working knowledge of one European language besides English is strongly recommended.

History of Intl Cinema-1

Submitted by isagor on
22400
32400
CMST 28500, ENGL 48700, ARTH 28500, ARTH 38500, CMST 48500, MAPH 33600, ENGL 29300, ARTV 20002
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2017-2018
Lastra

This course introduces what was singular about the art and craft of silent film. Its general outline is chronological. We also discuss main national schools and international trends of film making. Equivalent Course(s): ARTH 28500,ARTH 38500,ARTV 26500,ARTV 36500,CMLT 22400,CMLT 32400,CMST 48500,ENGL 29300,ENGL 48700,MAPH 36000

Fate and Duty: European Tragedy from Aeschylus to Brecht

Submitted by isagor on
22402
32402
GRMN 22402, CLCV 22117, CLAS 32117, REES 22402
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2017-2018
Boris Maslov

This class will explore the development of European drama from Attic tragedy and comedy and their reception in Ancient Rome and French Neoclassicism to the transformation of dramatic form in 18-20th c. European literatures. The focus will be on the evolution of plot, characterization, time-and-space of dramatic action, ethical notions (free will, guilt, conscience), as well as on representations of affect. All readings in English. No prerequisites.

Returning the Gaze: the West and the Rest

Submitted by jenniequ on
23201
33201
REES 2/39012, NEHC 2/30885
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2017-2018
Angelina Ilieva

Aware of being observed. And judged. Inferior... Abject… Angry... Proud…
This course provides insight into identity dynamics between the “West,” as the center of economic power and self-proclaimed normative humanity, and the “Rest,” as the poor, backward, volatile periphery.  We investigate the relationship between South East European,  Russian, Turkish self-representations and the imagined Western gaze. Inherent in the act of looking at oneself through the eyes of another is the privileging of that other’s standard.  We will contemplate the responses to this existential position of identifying symbolically with a normative site outside of oneself -- self-consciousness, defiance, arrogance, self-exoticization -- and consider how these responses have been incorporated in the texture of the national, gender, and social identities in the region.  Orhan Pamuk, Ivo Andrić, Nikos Kazantzakis, Aleko Konstantinov, Emir Kusturica, Milcho Manchevski, Alexander Herzen, Fyodor Dostoevsky