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History and Modern Arabic Literature

Submitted by vickylim on
30551
ARAB 30551
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2012-2013
Orit Bashkin

PQ:  reading knowledge of Arabic (namely three years of Arabic at least) is required; students are expected to read the novels as part of their homework assignment.

The class studies historical novels and the insights historians might gain from contextualizing and analyzing them. The Arab middle classes were exposed to a variety of newspapers and literary and scientific magazines, which they read at home and in societies and clubs, during the late nineteenth century and the early twentieth. Such readers learned much about national identity, gender relations and Islamic reform from historical novels popularized in the local press.  Some of these novels were read not only by adults, but also by children, and consequently their ideas reached a very large audience. The novels’ writers paid great attention to debates concerning political theory and responded to discourses that were occurring in the public spheres of urban Middle East centers and, concurrently, appropriated and discussed themes debated among Orientalists and Western writers. The class will explore these debates as well as the connections between the novel and other genres in classical Arabic literature which modern novels hybridized and parodied.  It will survey some of the major works in the field, including historical novels by Gurji Zaydan, Farah Antun, Nikola Haddad, and Nagib Mahfuz.

Ideas of Lyric

Submitted by vickylim on
34270
MAPH 34270,ENGL 24270,ENGL 34270
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2012-2013
Joshua Adams

What is lyric poetry? Should the genre be defined by its relationship to song? By the convention of a first-person speaker? By reference to a particular model of the self or the person? By the presence of ambiguity or paradox? By the fact that it resists paraphrase? Or is the lyric ultimately a product of practices and institutions that can and should be historicized? This course will attempt to answer some of these questions by surveying some important modern and contemporary theories of lyric poetry. We will read philosophical and critical work by, among others, Hegel, Wordsworth, J.S. Mill, T.S. Eliot, William Empson, Theodor Adorno, Paul de Man, W.R. Johnson, Allen Grossman, Robert von Hallberg, Susan Stewart, Virginia Jackson, Daniel Tiffany, and Oren Izenberg. We will analyze these texts as arguments, but also test their claims against actual poems. Requirements include a class presentation and a final paper.

Current MAPH students and 3rd and 4th years in the College. All others by instructor consent only. THIS COURSE WILL NOW BE HELD ON MW AT 1:30-2:50 FOR THE UPCOMING SPRING 2013 QUARTER.

Eden to Eliot, J.C. to Jay-Z: The Bible in Western Culture

Submitted by vickylim on
20360
30360
JWSC 20006, NEHC 20406
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2012-2013
Charles Huff

The Bible, a complex anthology of literature from a variety of religious, political, and historical perspectives from ancient Israel, has been primary textual authority in Western culture, politics, and religion. This class will explore how the authority of the Bible has been understood and used by people in Western societies in their political, historical, religious, and aesthetic contexts. We will accomplish this by a close reading of both the biblical texts and their reception in the texts, music, and visual arts of Western civilization, with a special emphasis on the use of these receptions in particular societies. The material covered in this course is necessarily selective; the course will give a basic literacy in the Bible and its use, and, more importantly, it will also teach the student to recognize and analyze biblical allusions in their future research.

Jewish Thought and Literature III: Biblical Voices in Modern Hebrew Literature

Submitted by vickylim on
20401
30401
JWSC 20006,NEHC 20406,NEHC 30406,RLST 20406
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2012-2013
Na'ama Rokem

The Hebrew Bible is the most important intertextual point of reference in Modern Hebrew literature, a literary tradition that begins with the (sometimes contested) claim to revive the ancient language of the Bible. In this course, we will consider the Bible as a source of vocabulary, figurative language, voice and narrative models in modern Hebrew and Jewish literature, considering the stakes and the implications of such intertextual engagement. Among the topics we will focus on: the concept of language-revival, the figure of the prophet-poet, revisions and counter-versions of key Biblical stories (including the story of creation, the binding of Isaac and the stories of King David), the Song of Songs in Modern Jewish poetry.

The Arab Israeli Conflict in Literature and Film

Submitted by vickylim on
20906
30906
NEHC 20906/30906; HIST 26004/36004; JWSC 25903
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2012-2013
Orit Bashkin

The course looks at the realities of the Arab Israel conflict as portrayed by Palestinian and Israeli writers. We will explore works of poets, novelists, short stories writers, filmmakers and artists, and the meanings they ascribe to such concepts as “homeland,” “exile,” “nation,” “struggle,” and “liberation.” We will study the analysis novelists offer to moments of politicized violence in the region, and the reception on these analysis in the Palestinian and Israeli publics. Finally, we will study the fields of power related to production of these works: who has the power to write/film, and thus represent, the realities of the Arab-Israeli conflict? Which voices are silenced in these processes? How can historians reconstruct radical voices in their analysis of the events by reading works of literature? Reading materials include works by Emile Habibi, Ghassan Kanafani, Mahmud Darwish, Amos Oz, Dahlia Ravikovitch and S. Yizhar.  The class is open to graduate and undergraduate students. No prior knowledge of Hebrew or Arabic is required.

War & Peace

Submitted by vickylim on
22301
32301
RUSS 22302 (=RUSS 32302, ENGL 28912, ENGL 32302, FNDL 27103, HIST 23704)
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2012-2013
William Nickell

Close reading of Tolstoy’s novel, along with additional fiction and background material

Returning the Gaze: Balkans & Western Europe

Submitted by vickylim on
23201
33201
NEHC 20885/30885
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2012-2013
Angelina Ilieva

This course investigates the complex relationship between South East European self-representations and the imagined Western "gaze" for whose benefit the nations stage their quest for identity and their aspirations for recognition. We also think about differing models of masculinity, the figure of the gypsy as a metaphor for the national self in relation to the West, and the myths Balkans tell about themselves. We conclude by considering the role that the imperative to belong to Western Europe played in the Yugoslav wars of succession. Some possible texts/films are Ivo Andric, Bosnian Chronicle; Aleko Konstantinov, Baj Ganyo; Emir Kusturica, Underground; and Milcho Manchevski, Before the Rain.

Mikhail Bakhtin and Yurii Lotman: Polyphony to Semiosphere

Submitted by vickylim on
23502
33502
RUSS 23501/33501
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2012-2013
Lina Steiner

This seminar will focus on major works by the Russian philosopher, philologist and literary theorist Mikhail Bakhtin (1895-1975), including his early philosophical work Author and Hero in Aesthetic Activity, his essays on Speech genres and the Bildungsroman, as well as his books Rabelais and His World and Problems of Dostoevsky's Poetics. We will also read contemporary scholarly studies devoted to Bakhtin and his circle (Clark&Holquist, Morson&Emerson, Tihanov etc.) In the last two weeks of the seminar we will turn to Yurii Lotman, examining his works on semiotics of culture as an original approach to literary theory and semiotics as well as a response to Bakhtin.

The course is open to advanced undergraduates and graduate students. All texts are in English. Discussion and final papers are in English. There are no prerequisites for this course.

When Characters Meet Their Authors: Frontiers of Fiction

Submitted by vickylim on
24713
34713
FREN 24713/34713
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2012-2013
Francoise Lavocat

This course will examine the role and function of both the author and the character by investigating the long exploited narrative device of their encounter within the fictional world. In so doing, we will reflect upon the boundaries of fiction (do they exist ? what is their nature: logical, narratological, ontological ?).  We will read French, Spanish, Italian, and English texts, encompassing a variety of genres and media, from the early modern to contemporary periods.   Authors will include Cervantes, Molière, Fénelon, Bougeant, Pirandello, Caumery, Woody Allen, Paul Auster, and Jonathan Coe.

Note: All readings will be offered English, although students may read French, Italian and Spanish texts in their original language.   Students taking the course for French credit must read all French texts in the original language and do written work in French.  Prerequisites:  For FREN, at least two literature level courses (FREN 21700 or above); for Comp Lit, two literature level courses (200-level and above).

Greece/China

Submitted by vickylim on
24903
34903
CLCV 27612, CLAS 37612, EALC 24901, EALC 34901
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2012-2013
Tamara Chin

This class will explore three sets of paired authors from ancient China and Greece: Herodotus/Sima Qian; Plato/Confucius; Homer/Book of Songs.  Topics will include genre, authorship, style, cultural identity, and translation, as well as the historical practice of Greece/China comparative work.

Plato on Poets

Submitted by vickylim on
25013
35013
PORT 25013/35013, SCTH 30612
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2012-2013
Miguel Tamen

Unhappiness

Submitted by vickylim on
25703
35703
SCTH 35703,SCTH 25703,PHIL 21402,PHIL 31402,
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2012-2013
Irad Kimhi

"Nothing is funnier then unhappiness" says Nelly in Beckett's Endgame. We shall seek to distinguish between unhappiness, as the subject of poetic works, from unhappiness as it is understood by philosophy, which, I would argue, is precisely as funny as nothing. We shall discuss some famous unhappy families. A Greek tragedy (Sophocles: Oedipus Tyrannus), a Renaissance tragedy (Shakespeare, Hamlet), a modern theater of the absurd (Beckett: Endgame).

Renaissance Romance

Submitted by vickylim on
26500
36500
RLIT 52100
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2012-2013
Michael Murrin

Renaissance Romance

Submitted by vickylim on
26500
36500
RLIT 52100
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2012-2013
Michael Murrin

Strangers to Ourselves: Émigré Literature and Film from Russia and South Eastern Europe

Submitted by vickylim on
26902
36902
SOSL 26900 (=SOSL 36900, RUSS 26900, RUSS 36900)
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2012-2013
Angelina Ilieva

“Life is more important than the forms in which it is lived,” wrote Ivo Andric, the 1961 Nobel Prize winner from Yugoslavia, in a novel about cultural continuity and change. Emigration involves, among other things, the mastery of another language, the back and forth between familiar and unfamiliar cultures, the creation of new dimensions of one’s identity. In this course, we will examine the painful processes of forging of hybrid cultural selves through literary works through which Russian and South East European writers seek to forge new meanings and selves from the nostalgia, the anger, the feeling of homelessness, and the exhilarating sense of weightlessness. 

Historicizing Desire

Submitted by vickylim on
27000
37001
EALC 27410/37410, CLCV 27706, GNSE 28001
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2012-2013
Tamara Chin

This course examines conceptions of desire in ancient China and ancient Greece through an array of early philosophical, literary, historical, legal, and medical texts. We will explore the broader cultural background of the two ancient periods, and engage with theoretical debates on the history of sexuality, feminist and queer studies, and East/West studies.

Fictions, Ideals, and Norms

Submitted by vickylim on
28601
38601
FREN 28600/38600; (=SCTH XXXXX)
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2012-2013
Thomas Pavel

This course will discuss the ways in which fiction imagines a multitude of individual cases meant to incite reflection on moral practices.  The topics will include: the distance between the “I” and its life, the birth of moral responsibility, and the role of affection and gratitude.  We will read philosophical texts by Elisabeth Anscombe, Charles Taylor, Robert Pippin, Hans Joas, Charles Larmore, and Candace Vogler, and literary texts by Shakespeare, Balzac, Theodor Fontane, Henry James, Carson McCullers, and Sandor Marai.  

Fiction, Ideals, and Norms

Submitted by vickylim on
28601
38601
FREN 28600/38600, SCTH 38211
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2012-2013
Thomas Pavel

The course will discuss the ways in which fiction imagines a multitude of individual cases meant to incite reflection on moral practices.  The topics will include: the distance between the “I” and its life, the birth of moral responsibility, and the role of affection and gratitude.  We will read philosophical texts by Elisabeth Anscombe, Charles Taylor, Robert Pippin, Hans Joas, Charles Larmore, and Candace Vogler, and literary texts by Shakespeare, Balzac, Theodor Fontane, Henry James, Carson McCullers, and Sandor Marai.  

Renaissance Epic

Submitted by vickylim on
29100
39100
RLIT 36300
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2012-2013
Michael Murrin

Modern Rewritings of the Gospel Narratives

Submitted by vickylim on
34409
24409
GRMN 24413, GRMN 34413, RLST 28809, RLIT 34400, SCTH 34009
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2012-2013
Olga Solovieva

This interdisciplinary course focuses on the literary dimension of the gospels and on their artistic reception in modern culture. Starting from a presentation of narrative theory, it asks whether religious and secular narratives differ in structure, and illuminates narrative conventions of different media and genres. Both thematic aspects (what aspects of the gospels are selected for development in modern adaptations?) and features of presentation (how do different media and styles transform similar content?) will be considered. Principal works include Johann Sebastian Bach, The Passion According to St. Matthew (1720); Ernest Renan, The Life of Jesus (1865); Nikos Kazantzákis, The Last Temptation of Christ (1955); Pasolini, The Gospel According to Matthew (1964); José Saramago, The Gospel According to Jesus Christ (1991); Norman Mailer, The Gospel According to the Son (1997); and Monty Python, Life of Brian (1979). Secondary readings include Mieke Bal, Narratology, and Bultmann, History of the Synoptic Tradition.