Imaginary Worlds: The Fantastic and Magic Realism in Russia and Southeastern Europe

Submitted by Anonymous on
27701
=SOSL 27700/37700, RUSS 27300/37300
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2009-2010
Angelina Ilieva

In this course, we will ask what constitutes the fantastic and magic realism as literary genres while reading some of the most interesting writings to have come out of Russia and Southeastern Europe. While considering the stylistic and narrative specificities of the genres, we will also think about their political functions - from subversive to escapist, to supportive of a nationalist imaginary - in different contexts and at different historic moments in the two regions. We will ask whether there are such things as a Balkan and Russian type of magic realism and we will think about the differences between the genres of magic realism and the fantastic. We will also look at the similarities of the works from different countries – the lyricism of expression, eroticism and nostalgia, and will argue for and against considering such similarities constitutive of an overall Balkan sensibility.

Imaginary Worlds: The Fantastic and Magic Realism from Russia and Southeastern Europe

Submitted by jenniequ on
27701
37701
SOSL 2/37700, RUSS 2/37300
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2016-2017
Angelina Ilieva

In this course, we will ask what constitutes the fantastic and magic realism as literary genres while reading some of the most interesting writings to have come out of Russia and Southeastern Europe. While considering the stylistic and narrative specificities of this narrative mode, we also think about its political functions —from subversive to escapist, to supportive of a nationalist imaginary—in different contexts and at different historic moments in the two regions.

Imaginary Worlds: Fantastic & Magic Realism in Russia & Southeastern Europe

Submitted by vickylim on
27701
37701
SOSL 27700 / 37700, RUSS 27300, RUSS 37300
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2014-2015
Angelina Ilieva

In this course, we will ask what constitutes the fantastic and magic realism as literary genres while reading some of the most interesting writings to have come out of Russia and Southeastern Europe. While considering the stylistic and narrative specificities of this narrative mode, we also think about its political functions —from subversive to escapist, to supportive of a nationalist imaginary—in different contexts and at different historic moments in the two regions.

Lucretius and Karl Marx

Submitted by Anonymous on
27900
37900
=ANST 25606, CLAS 35606, CLCV 25606, FNDL 24211
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2006-2007
Elizabeth Asmis

Lucretius was a follower of Epicurus, whom Marx called the greatest representative of Greek enlightenment. In his poem On the Nature of Things, Lucretius seeks to convert his fellow Romans to an Epicurean way of life. He explains in detail what the world is made of (atoms) and that there is no reason to fear the gods or death. Marx wrote his doctoral dissertation on Epicurus and Lucretius. He was especially enthusiastic about the idea, which was developed by Lucretius, that humans are free to shape their own lives.

Racine's Phdre: Text, Sources, and Translation

Submitted by Anonymous on
28000
=FNDL 29401, FREN 23201
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2006-2007
Larry Norman, David Wray

Course meets the critical/intellectual methods course requirement for students majoring in Comparative Literature. We read Racine's Phdre closely for its dramatic and poetic structures as well as its philosophical, psychological, and moral themes. We consider Racine's principal ancient sources, Euripides and Seneca, placing all three versions in their intellectual and aesthetic contexts. We study twentieth-century translations of Phèdre (Wilbur, Hughes) in light of translation theory and practice. Textual study is complemented by scene study performance. Classes conducted in English. Optional French discussion sessions offered weekly. French majors do all written work in French. Comparative Literature majors read one tragedy in the original (French, Latin, or Greek).

Aeneids in Translation

Submitted by Anonymous on
28001
38001
=CLAS 37200, CLCV 27200, FNDL 26611
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2007-2008
David Wray

We confront Virgil's Aeneid in translation as a poem, as an artifact and representation of Greco-Roman culture, as a response to a millennial oral (Homeric) poetic tradition and a particular historical (Augustan) moment, as a reflection of ancient thought rich with significance for contemporary questions about human life, and as a central piece of world literature. Readings include comparative study of English poetic translations ranging from early modernity (Caxton, Douglas, Phayer, Surrey, and Dryden) to the twentieth century (Taylor, Lewis, Jackson Knight, Mandelbaum, and Fitzgerald) and beyond (Lombardo and Fagles). Students who are majoring in Comparative Literature compare versions of a book of the Aeneid in at least two languages.

A Hero and a Fool: Don Quixote and its impact on art and literature

Submitted by vickylim on
28101
38101
SPAN 24202/34202, REMS 34202, SCTH 38250, FNDL 21211
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2014-2015
Fred de Armas, Thomas Pavel

The course will study the most popular novel of Early Modern times, its heroic origins, its comedy, and its humanist message.  The adventures of Don Quixote on the dusty roads of La Mancha challenge the actual world in the name of a dream and mix the highest ideals with the humblest reality.  We will see how Cervantes’s novel dialogues with the narratives of its period and later play a major role in English, French, Russian, and Spanish fiction.  We will also examine and appreciate the silent omnipresence of Italian Renaissance art in this novel.

The course will be taught in English.  Spanish majors will read the text in the original and use Spanish for course assignments. 

Don Quixote

Submitted by Anonymous on
28101
38101
=RLLT 34202, REMS 34202, FNDL 21211, SCTH 38250, SPAN 24202/34202
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2011-2012
F De Armas, T Pavel

PQ: For Spanish credit SPAN 21700. The course will provide a close reading of Cervantes' Don Quixote and discuss its links with Renaissance art and Early Modern narrative genres. On the one hand, Don Quixote can be viewed in terms of prose fiction, from the ancient Greek romances to the medieval books of knights errant and the Renaissance pastoral novels. On the other hand, Don Quixote exhibits a desire for Italy through the utilization of Renaissance art. Beneath the dusty roads of La Mancha and within Don Quixote's chivalric fantasies, the careful reader will come to appreciate glimpses of images with Italian designs. The course will be taught in English. The course format would be alternating lectures by two faculty members on Mondays and Wednesdays. Fridays are devoted to the discussion of the materials presented on MW.

Don Quijote

Submitted by Anonymous on
28101
38101
=CMLT 28101, FNDL 21211, RLLT 34202, SPAN 24202/34202
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2009-2010
Frederick de Armas, Thomas Pavel

This course will provide a close reading of Cervantes' Don Quijote and discuss its links with Renaissance art and Early Modern narrative genres. On the one hand, Don Quijote can be viewed in terms of prose fiction, from the ancient Greek romances to the medieval books of knights errant and the Renaissance pastoral novels. On the other hand, Don Quijote exhibits a desire for Italy through the utilization of Renaissance art. The course will be taught in English. Spanish majors and Spanish graduate students will read the text in the original and use Spanish for the course assignments.

Cervantes's Don Quijote

Submitted by Anonymous on
28101
38101
=FNDL 21211, RLLT 34202, SPAN 24202
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2007-2008
Frederick de Armas, Thomas Pavel

This course is a close reading of Cervantes's Don Quijote that discuss its links with Renaissance art and Early Modern narrative genres. On the one hand, Don Quijote can be viewed in terms of prose fiction, from the ancient Hellenistic romances to the spectacular vigor of the books of knight errants and the French pastoral and heroic romances. On the other hand, Don Quijote exhibits a desire for Italy through the utilization of Renaissance art. Beneath the dusty roads of La Mancha and within Don Quijote's chivalric fantasies, students come to appreciate glimpses of images with Italian designs. Classes conducted in English; Spanish majors do all work in Spanish.

Cervantes's Enigmatic Feasts: The Exemplary Novels and Don Quixote, Part II

Submitted by Anonymous on
28102
=REMS 34301, SPAN 24311/34311
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2010-2011
Frederick de Armas

This course focuses on The Exemplary Novels (1613) and Don Quijote, Part II (1615) from the point of view of calendared feasts. To the recently instituted Gregorian calendar, the novel superimposes at least three other time maps. First, the Julian calendar with its many feasts as depicted in Ovid's Fasti ; second, the celestial movement through the twelve signs of the zodiac as represented by Hercules' twelve labors; and third, the Egyptian lunar calendar that leads to the knight's defeat. This meandering through calendars creates an instability and sense of unease that recalls the changes in mapping that are taking place with the discovery of America and the change to a heliocentric cosmos. The Novelas show an inordinate interest in feasts while, as Don Quixote proceeds, a kind of dilatio takes place, as Don Quixote diverts his route over and over again from his destination (Zaragoza and the feast of St. George). Time then becomes a subjective phenomenon that affects both the reader and the characters. We examine Cervantes's novel through the lenses of Ovid's Fasti and Apuleius' Golden Ass . Maps and paintings of the period are also examined. Classes taught in English. Students in Spanish and REMS read the text in the original language and write their papers in Spanish.

Spiritual Exercises and Moral Perfectionism

Submitted by Anonymous on
28200
38200
=DVPR 31202. PHIL 21202/31202, RLST 23501
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2006-2007
Arnold Davidson

A number of philosophers have recently proposed a new way of approaching ethics (and of reconceiving the task of philosophy) that focuses on exercises of self-transformation and ideals of moral perfection (sometimes conceived of as forms of wisdom). A distinctive set of notions, such as spiritual exercises, practices of the self, ways of life, the aesthetics of existence, the care of the self, conversion, and moral exemplarity, is meant to displace the picture of morality as primarily a code of good conduct. We shall study three contemporary authors who are central to reviving this way of thinking about ethical practice - Pierre Hadot, Michel Foucault, and Stanley Cavell. Their work will be read against the background of some classic texts in the history of philosophy in an attempt to uncover the historical tradition and the contemporary significance of this conception of the moral life.

Beautiful Souls, Adventurers and Rogues. The European 18th Century Novel

Submitted by jenniequ on
28240
38240
SCTH 38240, FREN 25301/35301
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2016-2017
Thomas Pavel
 
 

The course will examine several major 18th-century novels, including Manon Lescaut by Prevost, Pamela and fragments from Clarissa by Richardson, Shamela and fragments from Joseph Andrews by Fielding, Jacques le Fataliste by Diderot, and The Sufferings of Young Werther by Goethe.

 

The course is taught in English.  A biweekly session in French will be held for majors and graduate students in French and Comp Lit.

 

European Romanticism

Submitted by Anonymous on
28300
=GRMN 28300
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2006-2007
Françoise Meltzer

PQ: Reading knowledge of German. This course examines the philosophical foundations of Early German Romanticism and the major writers belonging to that period (i.e., F. Schlegel, Wackenroder, Tieck, Novalis, Bonaventura, Eichendorff ). Simultaneously, we consider the manner in which the Frhromantiker affected the English and French versions of Romanticism.

Comparative Metrics

Submitted by Anonymous on
28401
38401
=CLAS 38410, CLCV 28410, ENGL 28914/38401, GRMN 28411/38411, SLAV 28502/38502
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2010-2011
Boris (Rodin) Maslov

Working knowledge of one European language besides English is strongly recommended. This class offers an overview of major European systems of versification, with particular attention to their historical development. We are particularly concerned with Graeco-Roman quantitative metrics, its afterlife, and the evolution of Germanic and Slavic verse. In addition to analyzing the formal properties of verse, we inquire into their relevance for the articulation of poetic genres and, more broadly, the history of literary (and sub-literary) systems.

Literature and Madness

Submitted by Anonymous on
28600
=GRMN 26500
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2007-2008
Christiane Frey

This course explores the curious proximity between literature and the discourse on madness in the modern era. Discussion topics include definitions of insanity and their evolution across time, insane or deviant characters and their function in drama and fiction, the topos of the poet as madman, and the poetics of madness. Authors discussed may include Cervantes, Shakespeare, Goethe, Tieck, Hoffmann, Bchner, Poe, Gogol, James, Hauptmann, Dblin, Pirandello, Schnitzler, Kant, Pinel, Reil, Lombroso, Schreber, and Freud.

Fictions, Ideals, and Norms

Submitted by vickylim on
28601
38601
FREN 28600/38600; (=SCTH XXXXX)
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2012-2013
Thomas Pavel

This course will discuss the ways in which fiction imagines a multitude of individual cases meant to incite reflection on moral practices.  The topics will include: the distance between the “I” and its life, the birth of moral responsibility, and the role of affection and gratitude.  We will read philosophical texts by Elisabeth Anscombe, Charles Taylor, Robert Pippin, Hans Joas, Charles Larmore, and Candace Vogler, and literary texts by Shakespeare, Balzac, Theodor Fontane, Henry James, Carson McCullers, and Sandor Marai.  

Fiction, Ideals, and Norms

Submitted by vickylim on
28601
38601
FREN 28600/38600, SCTH 38211
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2012-2013
Thomas Pavel

The course will discuss the ways in which fiction imagines a multitude of individual cases meant to incite reflection on moral practices.  The topics will include: the distance between the “I” and its life, the birth of moral responsibility, and the role of affection and gratitude.  We will read philosophical texts by Elisabeth Anscombe, Charles Taylor, Robert Pippin, Hans Joas, Charles Larmore, and Candace Vogler, and literary texts by Shakespeare, Balzac, Theodor Fontane, Henry James, Carson McCullers, and Sandor Marai.  

Major Works of Goethe

Submitted by vickylim on
28610
GRMN 28600
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2012-2013
David Wellbery

This course is an intensive study of selected works (i.e., poetry, drama, fiction, essays) by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe. Students will become acquainted with one of the major figures in the history of European culture. Works to be considered include: Faust I, The Sorrows of Young Werther, Novelle, Farbenlehre (some appropriately excerpted). The seminar will also explore Goethe's life and times. All works to be read in German. Discussions in German.

Major Works of Modernism

Submitted by Anonymous on
28700
=GRMN 29000
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2010-2011
David Wellbery

This course is centered on several canonical works of classical modernism: Hugo von Hofmannsthal's Ein Brief, Robert Walser's Jakob von Gunten , Thomas Mann's Tod in Venedig , Franz Kafka's Die Verwandlung , Arthur Schnitzler's Fräulein Else , and Bertolt Brecht's Mutter Courage und ihre Kinder ; and poetry by Stefan George, Hofmannsthal, Gottfried Benn, Rainer Maria Rilke, and Georg Trakl; as well as essays by Georg Simmel, Walter Benjamin, and Robert Musil. On the basis of the works studied, we endeavor to develop a concept of modernism sufficiently capacious to embrace radically opposed literary and cultural agendas. All work in German.

Major Works of Modernism

Submitted by Anonymous on
28700
=GRMN 29000
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2007-2008
David Wellbery

This course is centered on several canonical works of classical modernism: Hugo von Hofmannsthal's Ein Brief ; Robert Walser's Jakob von Gunten ; Thomas Mann's Tod in Venedig ; Franz Kafka's Die Verwandlung ; Arthur Schnitzler's Frulein Else ; Bertolt Brecht's Mutter Courage und ihre Kinder ; poetry by Stefan George, Hofmannsthal, Gottfried Benn, Rainer Maria Rilke, and Georg Trakl; essays by Georg Simmel, Walter Benjamin, and Robert Musil. On the basis of the works studied we shall endeavor to develop a concept of modernism sufficiently capacious to embrace radically opposed literary and cultural agendas. Readings and discussion in German.

Novels of Self-Discovery: Stendhal, Flaubert, and Fontane

Submitted by Anonymous on
28701
38701
=CMLT 28701. FREN 26400/36400
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2007-2008
Thomas Pavel

PQ: Third- or fourth-year standing and consent of instructor. This course is a study of Stendhal's The Charterhouse of Parma, Flaubert's Madame Bovary, and Fontane's Effi Briest that emphasizes the search for self-identity and the erratic pursuit of happiness. Classes conducted in English. Students who are majoring or minoring in French read the French texts in the original and participate in a weekly French discussion group.

Nietzsche

Submitted by Anonymous on
28711
=GRMN 28711
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2011-2012
D Wellbery

This course provides, in lectures and discussion sections, an introduction to Nietzsche's major writings from Birth of Tragedy to The Antichrist. Nietzsche's evolving philosophical position as well as his cultural criticism and his literary and music criticism will be examined. Topics include: the tragic, pessimism and affirmation, nihilism, antiquity and modernity, philosophical psychology, the critique of morality, the interpretation of Christianity. Nietzsche's biography, the major influences on his thought, and his impact on twentieth-century culture will also be considered, if only in glimpses.

The Individual, Form, and the Novel

Submitted by Anonymous on
28801
38801
=ENGL 28906/48906, ISHU 28103, SLAV 25100/35100
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2007-2008
Lina Steiner

PQ: Advanced standing. This course is an exploration and comparison of several different strategies used by European novelists to represent an autonomous individual, all of which give rise to specific novelistic forms (e.g., autobiography, Bildungsroman , novel of manners, psychological novel). The primary bibliography for this course includes works by Rousseau, Goethe, Stendhal, and Tolstoy. We also read critical works by Georg Lukacs, Franco Moretti, Clement Lugowski, Mikhail Bakhtin, Lidia Ginzburg, and Alex Woloch. Texts in English and the original; discussion and papers in English.

Health Care and the Limits of State Action

Submitted by vickylim on
28900
BIOS 29323,BPRO 28600,HMRT 28602
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2015-2016
E. Lyon, H. Saussy
In a time of great human mobility and weakening state frontiers, epidemic disease is able to travel fast and far, mutate in response to treatment, and defy the institutions invented to keep it under control: quarantine, the cordon sanitaire, immunization, and the management of populations. Public health services in many countries find themselves at a loss in dealing with these outbreaks of disease, a deficiency to which NGOs emerge as a response (an imperfect one to be sure). Through a series of readings in anthropology, sociology, ethics, medicine, and political science, we will attempt to reach an understanding of this crisis of both epidemiological technique and state legitimacy, and to sketch out options.  Prerequisite(s): Third- or fourth-year standing. This course does not meet requirements for the biological sciences major.

Health Care and Limits of State Action

Submitted by vickylim on
28900
BPRO 28600, BIOS 29323, HMRT 28602
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2013-2014
Haun Saussy; Evan Lyon

Epidemic disease is a challenge on many levels, and increasingly characteristic of our interlinked, post-statist, unequal world. Through a series of readings in anthropology, sociology, ethics, medicine, and political science, we will attempt to reach an understanding of this crisis of both epidemiological technique and state legitimacy, and to sketch out options.

Health Care and the Limits of State Action

Submitted by vickylim on
28900
BPRO 28600
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2012-2013
Evan Lyon; Haun Saussy

Epidemic disease is a challenge on many levels, and increasingly characteristic of our interlinked, post-statist, unequal world. Through a series of readings in anthropology, sociology, ethics, medicine, and political science, we will attempt to reach an understanding of this crisis of both epidemiological technique and state legitimacy, and to sketch out options.

Poetic Cinema

Submitted by Anonymous on
29000
39000
=CMST 25501/35501, ISHU 29002, RLIT 39000, RLST 28401, RUSS 29001/39001
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2006-2007
Robert Bird

Films are frequently denoted as poetic or lyrical in a vague sort of way. It has been applied equally to religious cinema and to the experimental avant-garde. Our task will be to interrogate this concept and to try to define what it actually is denoting. Films and critical texts will mainly be drawn from Soviet and French cinema of the 1920s-1930s and 1960s-1990s. Directors include Dovzhenko, Renoir, Cocteau, Resnais, Maya Deren, Tarkovsky, Pasolini, Jarman, and Sokurov. In addition to sampling these directors? own writings, we shall examine theories of poetic cinema by major critics from the Russian formalists to Andre Bazin beyond.

Silk Road Fictions

Submitted by Anonymous on
29001
=EALC 27450, ENGL 16181
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2007-2008
Tamara Chin

This course meets the critical/intellectual methods course requirement for students who are majoring in Comparative Literature. The Silk Road is a modern idealization of a pre-modern crossing of peoples, ideas, and cultural traditions across a Eurasian continent. The array of texts that falls under this rubric has historically grown from a few ancient Greek and Chinese narratives to embrace any number of works that exemplify or narrate cross-cultural encounters between a notional East and West. This course introduces students to some basic problems in cross-cultural comparative reading through the example of the Silk Road. We will look closely at a selection of Silk Road fictions and their relation to multiple literary or aesthetic traditions, and consider the ways in which writers have used, translated, and even forged ancient manuscripts in constructing cross-cultural history. We will also consider theories of world literature, cosmopolitanism, and bilingual and bicultural texts. Primary readings will include The Monkey and Monk (from the 16th century epic Chinese novel The Journey to the West ), the Greek Alexander Romance , Jamyang Norbu's The Mandala of Sherlock Holmes , and David Henry Hwang's M. Butterfly . Knowledge of classical Greek or Chinese is helpful but not required.

Renaissance Epic

Submitted by vickylim on
29100
39100
RLIT 36300
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2012-2013
Michael Murrin

Renaissance Epic

Submitted by Anonymous on
29100
39100
= ENGL 16300/36300, RLIT 36300
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2010-2011
Michael Murrin

A study of classical epic in the Renaissance or Early Modern period. Emphasis will be both on texts and on classical epic theory. We will read Tasso's Jerusalem Delivered , Camões' Lusiads , and Milton's Paradise Lost . A paper will be required and perhaps an examination.

Renaissance Epic

Submitted by Anonymous on
29100
39100
=CMLT 29100 , ENGL 36300/16300
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2008-2009
Michael Murrin

A study of classical epic in the Renaissance or Early Modern period. Emphasis will be both on texts and on classical epic theory. We will read Tasso's Jerusalem Delivered , Cames' Lusiads , and Milton's Paradise Lost . A paper will be required and perhaps an examination.

Pascal and Simone Weil on the Human Condition

Submitted by vickylim on
29101
39101
FREN 29100, FREN 39100
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2013-2014
Thomas Pavel

Pascal in the seventeenth century and Simone Weil in the twentieth formulated a compelling vision of the human condition, torn between greatness and misery. They showed how human imperfection coexists with the noblest callings, how attention struggles with diversion and how individuals can be rescued from their usual reliance on public opinion and customary beliefs. Both thinkers point to the religious dimension of human experience and suggest unorthodox ways of approaching it. The course will be taught in English. For French undergraduates and graduates, we will hold a by-weekly one-hour meeting to study the original French texts. Undergrads must be in their third or fourth year.

Colonial Spanish American Theatre: Cuzco and Lima

Submitted by vickylim on
29116
39116
LACS 29116,LACS 39116,SPAN 29116,SPAN 39116,
  • Spring
  • 2012-2013
Jose Rodriguez Garrido

This seminar is devoted to a comparative study of the development of theater in the two major cities of the Viceroyalty of Peru: Lima and Cuzco in the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. Although the starting point is the performance of works written in Spain, during this period several Creole writers wrote a significant set of plays in both cities. Through these plays, the local letrado elite participate actively in the colonial project either appropriating dominant models or redefining them. The result is a theatrical corpus that, although in formal terms seems merely to elaborate on peninsular models, it also reveals a complex range of linguistic and cultural relationships, which are characteristic of the colonial world: comedias marianas (comedies devoted to Virgin Mary) o autos sacramentales (sacramental plays) written in Quechua, dramas rewriting the events of the conquest as they were told by the chroniclers, courtly plays that adapt or adjust the parameters of the opera or French tragedy. From this perspective, the seminar will examine a set of representative authors (Juan de Espinosa Medrano, Gabriel Centeno de Osma, Lorenzo de las Llamosas, Pedro de Peralta Barnuevo and Francisco del Castillo). Spanish texts will be read in the original language and Quechua texts in Spanish translation. Those students taking the course for Ph.D or Spanish credit must complete all assignments in Spanish.  Those taking the course from other departments have the option of completing assignments in either English or Spanish.

Extremist Poetry: Paul Celan and Sylvia Plath

Submitted by Anonymous on
29200
39200
=ENGL 27802/47802, GRMN 29206/39206
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2006-2007
Robert von Hallberg

PQ: Reading knowledge of German is required. This course will focus largely on the relation of lyric poetry to extreme historical experience, to the Shoah in particular. We will focus on Celan's poems for seven weeks, and then on Plath's late work for three weeks.

The Idea of Europe in Realist Prose

Submitted by Anonymous on
29301
39301
=CMLT 29301. ENGL 28907/48907, ISHU 29303, SLAV 29800/39800
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2007-2008
Lina Steiner

The idea of Europe as a shared cultural space, in which different national cultures and literatures can engage in a dialogue, emerges in the second half of the nineteenth century in the works of the Western-European authors and several outsiders who include Gogol, Turgenev, and Henry James. This course examines the connections between the development of realist fiction and the formation of the transnational cultural conception of Europe as a realist-age successor of Goethe's conception of Weltliteratur. Our texts include fictional works, essays, and criticism by Goethe, Mme. de Stael Gogol, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Turgenev, and Henry James. Texts in English and the original; discussion and papers in English.

South Asian Aesthetics: Rasa to Rap, Kamasutra to Kant

Submitted by vickylim on
29302
39302
SALC 29300, SALC 49300
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2015-2016
Tyler Williams

This course introduces students to the rich traditions of aesthetic thought in South Asia, a region that includes (among others) the modern-day states of India, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Nepal and Sri Lanka. By engaging with theories of art, literature and music from the Indic and Indo-Persian traditions, we will attempt to better understand what happens in an aesthetic experience. A central concern will be thinking about how much any aesthetic tradition, be it South Asian or other, is rooted in the particular epistemic and cultural values of the society that produced it; we will therefore explore how ideas from the South Asian tradition can help us to understand not only South Asian material, but art in other societies as well, and to re-think the boundaries of 'aesthetic' thought.  Class discussion, small group work, and individual presentations will be regular features of the class. Two sessions will include performances by, and discussions with, performing artists (dancers and musicians). We will also make one visit to the Art Institute Chicago.

Classic Yiddish Fiction: Scholem-Aleichem and the Diasporic Imagination

Submitted by Anonymous on
29400
39400
=GRMN 27700/37700, YDDH 25500/35500
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2006-2007
Jan Schwarz

The seminar will examine the Yiddish writer Scholem-Aleichem's work as a prime example of the diasporic imagination in modern Jewish culture. The writer's greatest achievement was his monologues, oral narrative performances such as Tevye the Dairyman, the Railroad Stories and Menakhem Mendel. These key texts will be discussed in the context of Russian Jewry's crisis and transformation at the turn of the twentieth century. Scholem-Aleichem's political development will be traced in his relationship to the two dominant ideologies in Jewish Eastern Europe prior to World War I: Socialism and Zionism. Finally, Scholem-Aleichem's encounter with America during his visit in 1905-1906 and his immigration in 1914 will be discussed in connection with his play writing for the Yiddish stage and cinema. The course will delineate Scholem-Aleichem's unique literary universe and style, the pivotal expression of classic Yiddish fiction that remains one of the most original expressions of the diasporic imagination in modern Jewish culture. No prior knowledge of Yiddish is required. All readings will be in English. Students wanting to study the primary material in the original languages (Yiddish, Hebrew and Russian) are encouraged to do so.

Classic Yiddish Fiction: Sholem-Aleichem and the Diasporic Imagination

Submitted by Anonymous on
29401
39401
=ENGL 28908/48909, GRMN 27708/37708, RUSS 22901/32901, YDDH 27708/37700
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2008-2009
Jan Schwarz

This seminar examines the Yiddish writer Sholem-Aleichem's work as a prime example of the diasporic imagination in modern Jewish literature. Key texts (e.g., Tevye the Dairyman , the Railroad Stories , Menakhem Mendel ) are discussed in the context of Russian Jewry's crisis and transformation at the turn of the twentieth century. Sholem-Aleichem's encounter with America during his visit in 1905-06 and his immigration in 1914 are discussed in connection with his play writing for the Yiddish stage and cinema. We examine Sholem-Aleichem's unique literary universe and style as the pivotal expression of classic Yiddish fiction.

Le Règne des passions au 17e siècle

Submitted by vickylim on
29500
39500
FREN 24301/34301, REMS 34301
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2013-2014
Thomas Pavel

This course is a study of the Early Modern vision of human passions, as reflected in literature. We read plays by Shakespeare, Corneille and Racine, narratives by Cervantes, d’Urfé, Saint-Réal, and Mme de La Fayette and maxims by La Rochefoucauld and Pascal. The course is in French and most required texts are in French. Undergrads must be in their third or fourth year.

Le rgne des passions dans la littrature du XVIIe sicle

Submitted by Anonymous on
29500
39500
=FREN 24301/34301
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2006-2007
Thomas Pavel

A study of the vision of human passions, as reflected in 17th-century literature. We will discuss influential passages from Plato's Republic, Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics, and Pascal's Pensées, a selection of narratives from L'Astre by Honor d'Urf, as well as The Ill-advised curiosity by Cervantes, The Princess of Clves by Mme de La Fayette, King Lear by Shakespeare, Rodogune by Corneille and Britannucus by Racine. The course will be taught in French and the French texts will be read in the original language.

The Literature of the Fantastic

Submitted by Anonymous on
29600
=ENGL 28903/48904, ISHU 29301, RUSS 26702/36702
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2006-2007
Renate Lachmann TuTh 9:00-10:20 C 202

PQ: Open to graduates and undergraduates. This course will include texts by Russian and English authors, including Pushkin, Gogol, Bulgakov, Nabokov, Poe, H.G. Wells, and Oscar Wilde. Theoretical positions will be examined based on texts by Tzevtan Todorov, Jackson, Traill, Lachmann. All text will be in English.

Reading Course

Submitted by Anonymous on
29700
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2011-2012
Staff

PQ: Consent of instructor and Director of Undergraduate Studies. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Must be taken for a quality grade. This course does not satisfy distribution requirements for students who are majoring in CMLT unless an exception is made by the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

Reading Course

Submitted by Anonymous on
29700
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2011-2012
Staff

PQ: Consent of instructor and Director of Undergraduate Studies. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Must be taken for a quality grade. This course does not satisfy distribution requirements for students who are majoring in CMLT unless an exception is made by the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

Reading Course

Submitted by Anonymous on
29700
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2011-2012
Staff

PQ: Consent of instructor and Director of Undergraduate Studies. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Must be taken for a quality grade. This course does not satisfy distribution requirements for students who are majoring in CMLT unless an exception is made by the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

Intro to Comparative Lit I: Problems, Methods, Precedents

Submitted by vickylim on
29701
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2015-2016
Haun Saussy

 As the study of relations among the world's literary and other expressive,traditions, comparative literature confronts a host of questions. What do,works from different times and places have in common? How can we meaningfully assess their differences? How do we account for systematic and extra-systemic features of literature? Is translation ever adequate? This course offers consideration of these and related issues through influential critical examples. This course is the first of a two-quarter sequence required for all majors in Comparative Literature.

Intro to Comparative Lit I: Problems, Methods, Precedents

Submitted by vickylim on
29701
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2014-2015
Rana Choi

As the study of relations among the world's literary and other expressive,traditions, comparative literature confronts a host of questions. What do,works from different times and places have in common? How can we meaningfully assess their differences? How do we account for systematic and extra-systemic features of literature? Is translation ever adequate? This course offers consideration of these and related issues through influential critical examples. This course is the first of a two-quarter sequence required for all majors in Comparative Literature.

Introduction to Comparative Literature I: Problems, Methods, Precedents

Submitted by vickylim on
29701
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2013-2014
Haun Saussy

As the study of relations among the world's literary and other expressive,traditions, comparative literature confronts a host of questions. What do,works from different times and places have in common? How can we meaningfully assess their differences? How do we account for systematic and extra-systemic features of literature? Is translation ever adequate? This course offers consideration of these and related issues through influential critical examples. This course is the first of a two-quarter sequence required for all majors in Comparative Literature.

Introduction to Comparative Literature I: Problems, Methods, Precedents

Submitted by vickylim on
29701
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2012-2013
Haun Saussy

As the study of relations among the world's literary and other expressive,traditions, comparative literature confronts a host of questions. What do,works from different times and places have in common? How can we meaningfully assess their differences? How do we account for systematic and extra-systemic features of literature? Is translation ever adequate? This course offers consideration of these and related issues through influential critical examples. This course is the first of a two-quarter sequence required for all majors in Comparative Literature.

Introduction to Comparative Literature II: Theory & Practice of the Literary Avant-Garde

Submitted by vickylim on
29702
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2012-2013
Joel Calahan

This course takes a comparative approach to studying the innovations and legacy of the major European and American avant-garde movements, from Futurism and Surrealism through the postwar neo-avant-gardes to contemporary groupings such as L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E. We will consider major theory, poetry, and prose texts by writers such as Mayakovsky, Bely, Marinetti, Breton, Huidobro, O’Hara, Sanguineti, Roubaud, Perec, and Cortazar. Foreign language texts will be read in translation, though knowledge of at least one of the original languages (Russian, Italian, French, or Spanish) is preferred. 

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