Course Listing

Filter by course level:

Filter by quarter:

Filter by academic year:

The Politics of Hybridity

Submitted by vickylim on
21703
31703
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2015-2016
Leah Feldman

This course will explore the construct of hybridity through the development of anticolonial and postcolonial theory. In nuancing the distinction between these intellectual traditions and their respective formations in the contexts of decolonization, the Cold War and the US Academy, we will consider the work of Fanon, Césaire, C.L.R. James, Said, Spivak, Young, Bhabha, Glissant, Khatibi and others.

The Novel-Essay and its Past: From Artsybashev's Sanin to Musil’s Man Without Qualities

Submitted by vickylim on
21705
31705
REES 29811, GRMN 22716/32716
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2015-2016
Olga Solovieva
Two important examples of the the “novel-essay” or “novel of ideas”, Mikhail Artsybashev’s Sanin and Robert Musil's Man Without Qualities will be discussed in the light of the theory of the novel and in comparison with the genre of philosophical essays.  We will also consider the role of the narrator in modernist fiction. 
 

Classical Art in the Literature of Renaissance &Early Modern Italy, Spain and France

Submitted by vickylim on
23310
33310
SPAN 23300, SPAN 33300
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2015-2016
Frederick de Armas

As classical statues emerged from the ground as if they were corpses revived by ancient necromancers, delight and curiosity concerning these artistic findings spread from Renaissance Italy to the rest of Europe. Even so, there was one aspect that was missing. The great paintings of antiquity were mostly lost due to their fragility. Only some of the wall paintings of later periods remained. Thus, the names and works of famous Greek painters came to be known mainly through Pliny´s Natural History. This course will focus on three of these painters whose works, although destroyed, are preserved in writing and ekphrasis: Apelles, Timanthes and Zeuxis. We will investigate how they come to be painted and described anew in the art and literature of the Renaissance and Early Modern periods, from Vasari to Rubens; and from Boscán and Tirso de Molina to Cervantes and Montaigne. Although the course is taught in English, students need to have a reading knowledge of Spanish.

South Asian Aesthetics: Rasa to Rap, Kamasutra to Kant

Submitted by vickylim on
29302
39302
SALC 29300, SALC 49300
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2015-2016
Tyler Williams

This course introduces students to the rich traditions of aesthetic thought in South Asia, a region that includes (among others) the modern-day states of India, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Nepal and Sri Lanka. By engaging with theories of art, literature and music from the Indic and Indo-Persian traditions, we will attempt to better understand what happens in an aesthetic experience. A central concern will be thinking about how much any aesthetic tradition, be it South Asian or other, is rooted in the particular epistemic and cultural values of the society that produced it; we will therefore explore how ideas from the South Asian tradition can help us to understand not only South Asian material, but art in other societies as well, and to re-think the boundaries of 'aesthetic' thought.  Class discussion, small group work, and individual presentations will be regular features of the class. Two sessions will include performances by, and discussions with, performing artists (dancers and musicians). We will also make one visit to the Art Institute Chicago.